OSSPEAC

2018 Conference Sessions Descriptions and Disclosures

Meet our Presenters!  (Click to Download)

Presenter Disclosures (Click to Download)

 

The following is a list of descriptions for each conference session. Please review to decide which sessions you would like to attend. The sessions you select during the registration process provide us with crucial attendance information to assign rooms based on interest. We do not limit attendance to sessions because we understand there are occasions when your interests change. It is our continued goal to provide a comfortable learning environment for all, so please be courteous and mindful of your selections. Thank You!

 

SUNDAY SESSIONS 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

#1  RESOLVING ETHICAL DILEMMAS – BEST PRACTICES FOR SCHOOL-BASED SLPS AND AUDS; Gregg B. Thornton, Esq.,Carrie L. Spangler, Au.D.; CCC-A, Lisa A. Froehlich, Ph.D., CCC-SLP – Ethics is a verb – it’s all about what you do and how you do it. Ethical issues span every aspect of our practice and can present dilemmas for practitioners at all levels of experience. This session will address various facets of ethical dilemmas, including tips on how to respond when you find yourself caught between that proverbial rock and a hard place. Building on feedback from previous ethics presentations and dilemmas addressed by the Ohio licensure board, we have incorporated real-life scenarios into an interactive, engaging, and informative session that allows participants to decide whether an ethical dilemma is present. Beginner

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Name/describe common ethical issues that practitioners encounter in the school
  2. State ethical requirements adopted by the Ohio Speech and Hearing Professionals Board (OSHPB) and identify specific rules under each code of ethics that address specific
  3. State how the Code of Ethics OSHPB can be an effective resource to preventing ethical conflicts in the school setting and to educate others about the role of speech-language pathologists and educational
  4. List other resources/strategies for following best practices to resolve ethical
  5. Understand how to recognize and appropriately respond to an ethical
  6. Understand how to implement and follow an ethical decision-making process to effectively resolve an ethical dilemma.
  7. Identify when the practitioner has a duty to report ethical violations to the

 

#2    USING  SENSORY  BINS  TO  ENGAGE  YOUNG  COMMUNICATORS; Barbara Conrad, M.A., CCC-SLP; Chelsey   Mirto, M.A., CCC-SLP – Using sensory bins in therapy can engage and motivate learners while increasing interactions. SLPs report sessions are more productive with students who can’t seem to sit still. Prep time is easy too. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss the components of a sensory bin, and collaborate on creative ideas for sensory bins for their own therapy sessions. Come learn about the many benefits of sensory bins and take home a sensory bin starter kit. Beginner

 Participants will receive a Sensory Bin starter kit with materials that can be used in therapy later in the week. There is an additional cost of $35.00 for this session.  Registration is limited to first 50 participants.

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Describe what a sensory bin is and the advantages of using them with
  2. Discuss how to use sensory bins with students of different ages in order to target a variety of speech and language objectives.
  3. Identify creative options for fillers and manipulatives to make a successful sensory

 

#3   EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTION:  COMBINING THE PAST AND PRESENT FOR A BETTER TOMORROW; Bridget Simenc,   M.A.,CCC/SLP; Debbie Mulhall, Teacher and Supervisor – We will be tying in the most effective instruction strategies with 21st Century Skills. Participants will be challenged to think about creating projects that integrate science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM). They will also be encouraged to apply this to school, career and life skills. We will be discussing and practicing how these skills can be incorporated into the classroom and/or speech/language therapy on a regular basis. Intermediate

 

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Take the challenges that they practiced back to the
  2. Apply the skills with their student to enhance the 21st Century Skills that were highlighted and practiced in this session.
  3. Recognize and match student strengths with the tasks
  4. Incorporate different ways to assess

 

#4   ALL ABOUT THAT REPLACEMENT BEHAVIOR: HOW COMMUNICATION IS KEY TO BEHAVIOR CHANGE; Sasha Long, M.A., BCBA – We are all looking for behavior change. Whether you want your child to tell you when he has to go to the bathroom, your student to complete his work more quickly, or your husband to do the dishes – we are always trying to generate some little changes in other people. Using reinforcement & preventative interventions, we can replace negative behaviors with positive, prosocial, & functional communicative responses. This workshop will offer practical solutions to foster increases in positive, communicative behaviors and decreases in problem behaviors. This session will begin by exploring how to apply these strategies to everyday situations in an applicable and proactive way. This approach will focus on changing outcomes of behaviors by looking at the entire context and approaching behavior change from a function based perspective. The key is not only teaching communication, but teaching the right type of communication in order to produce long lasting behavior change. However, we all know – there are those times when things do not go as planned. Learn how to tackle those   high-stress situations where no option seems like the right one and all bets are off. This workshop highlights ready to use interventions and real-life scenarios. The concepts can be applied to a wide range of environments. Beginner

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Identify how and when to implement reinforcement to foster increases in positive, prosocial, and functional communicative
  2. Identify causes and functions of problem behavior and explore options for altering the environmental context to reduce these
  3. Develop strategies for coping during situations of extreme

 

#5  SIMPLE WAYS TO INCORPORATE AAC INTO THE CLASSROOM; Julie Marzano, M.S., OTR/L; Emily McCarthy, M.S., CCC-SLP – Learn how to implement AAC in classrooms using simple materials, games and books. This presentation will focus on incorporating Core Vocabulary, SGD mounting hacks, Smart Board Software ideas, iPad hacks and more while using an inter-professional model. Beginner/Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Use Dollar Store items, office supplies and household items, games to build fine motor and language
  2. Understand and apply Inter-Professional Practice Examples of what works/ doesn’t work in classrooms related to SGD/ AAC.
  1. Move ‘beyond labeling” with
  2. Adapt Smart Board activities, books and games to address Core Vocabulary and participation for children with complex
  3. LAAC/ SGD Mounting
  4. AAC/ SGD i-PAD

 

#6  LANGUAGE UNDERPERFORMANCE IN CHILDREN WHO ARE DEAF/HARD OF HEARING; Susan Wiley, M.D. –    Children who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing have made great progress in improved language outcomes. However, many children continue to have underperformance of language abilities. This presentation will discuss some of the factors which may be associated with language underperformance, how to identify atypical language learning patterns, and novel  strategies to help build expanded language skills. Beginner

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Describe factors associated with language underperformance in children who are Deaf/Hard of
  2. Identify red flags for atypical language learning in children who are Deaf/Hard of
  3. Describe alternative approaches to language which may help children who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing with language

 

#7  SLEUTHING FOR /R/ AND /S/ PRODUCTION; Lynn Berk – During this session, we will look closely at   determining when intervention should begin for /s/ and /r/ sound disorders. We will also address functional articulatory concerns and identification of strategies for sound production through shaping, tongue positioning and pharyngeal contraction. Five case studies will be presented along with a variety of strategies for teaching accurate sound production. Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Determine when intervention is warranted for /s/ and /r/.
  2. Assess and determine accurate resting tongue position to determine plan of
  3. List three strategies for teaching placement for /s/ production and three strategies for teaching placement for /r/ production.

 

SUNDAY SESSION – KEYNOTE PRESENTATION 7:30 – 8:30 p.m.

 

#8   LIFE LESSONS FROM THE TRAIL; Jeff Alt, M.S., CCC-SLP – I was inspired to become a Speech  Language Pathologist by my brother who was born with cerebral palsy, is non-verbal and lives at Sunshine Communities in Northwest Ohio. In my keynote, I will take you on my adventure along the 2160-mile Appalachian Trail dedicated to my brother. I will share edge of your seat tales involving bears, bugs, blisters, skunk bedmates and hilarious food cravings intertwined with profound, unique and powerful “life lessons” that I have transferred to life in the real world. My journey inspired the annual Sunshine Walk which has raised more than $500,000 for people with developmental disabilities. Beginner

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Balance IEP meetings, apply new state standards and achieve the goals and objectives set for our
  2. Increase productivity, enhance creativity, achieve life balance, and go distances beyond what they ever thought possible.

 

MONDAY SESSIONS

8:00 – 10:00 a.m. (Note the early start time)

#9             RESOLVING ETHICAL DILEMMAS – BEST PRACTICES FOR SCHOOL-BASED SLPS AND AUDS (REPEAT SESSION); Gregg

  1. Thornton, Esq.; Carrie L. Spangler, Au.D., CCC-A; Lisa A. Froehlich, Ph.D., CCC-SLP – Ethics is a verb – it’s all about what you do and how you do it. Ethical issues span every aspect of our practice and can present dilemmas for practitioners at all levels of experience. This session will address various facets of ethical dilemmas, including tips on how to respond when you find yourself caught between that proverbial rock and a hard place. Building on feedback from previous ethics presentations and dilemmas addressed by the Ohio licensure board, we have incorporated real-life scenarios into an interactive, engaging, and informative session that allows participants to decide whether an ethical dilemma is present. Beginner

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Name/describe common ethical issues that practitioners encounter in the school
  2. State ethical requirements adopted by the Ohio Speech and Hearing Professionals Board (OSHPB) and identify specific rules under each code of ethics that address specific
  3. State how the Code of Ethics OSHPB can be an effective resource to preventing ethical conflicts in the school setting and to educate others about the role of speech-language pathologists and educational
  4. List other resources/strategies for following best practices to resolve ethical
  5. Understand how to recognize and appropriately respond to an ethical
  6. Understand how to implement and follow an ethical decision-making process to effectively resolve an ethical dilemma.
  7. Identify when the practitioner has a duty to report ethical violations to the

 

#10  LITERACY ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES FOR STUDENTS WITH COMPLEX COMMUNICATION NEEDS;

Tina Moreno, M.A., CCC-SLP – This session will provide strategies for assessing and providing instruction for students with complex communication needs in the area of reading. A review of emergent literacy routines adapted for students who may be non-verbal, use AAC or struggle with functional communication skills will be shared. Strategies for adapting the Whole-to-Part Reading Assessment for conventional literacy students who struggle to participate in typical classroom assessment activities or adequately communicate understanding of written text will be described. Guidance will be provided for determining a student’s area of greatest need and then matching instructional strategies designed to help that student read with comprehension at one grade level higher. Beginner

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Differentiate between emergent literacy and conventional
  2. Explain 2-3 emergent literacy routines adapted for students with complex communication
  3. Describe adapted Whole-to-Part informal assessment strategies for word identification, listening comprehension, silent reading comprehension and print
  4. Determine area of greatest weakness preventing student from making gains in silent reading
  5. Identify 2-3 conventional instructional strategies based on student’s area of greatest

 

#11  RETHINKING  SCHOOL-AGE  LANGUAGE  ASSESSMENT; Sue Grogan-Johnson, Ph.D., CCC/SLP – In this    session we will consider the role of the SLP in determining language disability and the characteristics of a child’s language impairment. Topics covered include recent research on how to decide if we are using a “good” test; how to better quantify our observations, and the role of criterion referenced assessments. The goal of this session is to critically evaluate our assessment methods to improve service delivery. Intermediate

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Three (3) criteria for evaluating the quality of a language
  2. Evaluate classroom observation checklists for use in
  3. Examine methods for synthesizing test results to determine language

 

MONDAY SESSIONS 8:30 – 10:00 a.m.

 

#12  WHY DOES IT MATTER ANYWAY?  THE IMPACT OF HEARING LOSS IN SCHOOL AGED CHILDREN; Donna Fisher Smiley, Ph.D., CCC-A – The effects and impact of hearing loss on communication and learning is not a mystery to audiologists. It’s what we spend our days and hours thinking and talking about.  But, how effective are we at  conveying the true impact of hearing loss on school aged children to school personnel and parents? This session will focus on the construct of the impact of hearing loss in the classroom and tools/resources that may be used by audiologists to relay that information in a useful and meaningful way to positively impact the outcomes for children who have hearing loss. Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Outline the impact of hearing loss for school aged
  2. Compare and contrast listening fatigue in children with typical hearing to those with hearing
  3. Design an activity to be used to convey the impact of hearing loss to school based

 

#13           SUPERVISION  101 – DI REALLY  WANT  TO  DTHIS?   PRACTICAL  GUIDELINES  AND  TIPS  FOR  EFFECTIVE   AND SUCCESSFUL  SUPERVISION  OF  GRADUATE  STUDENTS; Doreen K. Binnie, M.A., CCC-SLP; Deborah K.  Thompson, M.A., CCC-SLP – You may have considered supervision but are reluctant to begin, or you have already supervised and are looking for ideas to improve your and the student’s experience. We will provide practical information to analyze and refine steps to create meaningful dialogue and expectations, to avoid missteps and understand how personality and generational thinking impact decision making.    Bring your experiences and questions to share! Beginner

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Evaluate their skills as a supervisor to improve their education of graduate students’ clinical and student teaching experience.
  2. Understand the generational and learning styles of students that affect feedback and expectations during a clinical assignment.

 

MONDAY SESSIONS 8:30 – 11:45 a.m.

 

#14   WORKING MEMORY AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT; Milton J. Dehn, Ed.D. – Working memory plays   a crucial role in all aspects of language development and functioning. This presentation will review the neurological structure of working memory, the influence of working memory on language development, assessment of working memory, and evidence-based working memory interventions that support language development.   Intermediate

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Identify the different components of working memory and the relations each has with language
  2. Describe three exercises or strategies that can improve verbal working memory

 

#15    ALL ABOUT THAT REPLACEMENT BEHAVIOR: HOW COMMUNICATION IS KEY TO BEHAVIOR CHANGE; Sasha    Long, M.A., BCBA – We are all looking for behavior change. Whether you want your child to tell you when he has to go to the bathroom, your student to complete his work more quickly, or your husband to do the dishes – we are always trying to generate some little changes in other people. Using reinforcement & preventative interventions, we can replace negative behaviors with positive, prosocial, & functional communicative responses.

This workshop will offer practical solutions to foster increases in positive, communicative behaviors and decreases in problem behaviors. This session will begin by exploring how to apply these strategies to everyday situations in an applicable and proactive way. This approach will focus on changing outcomes of behaviors by looking at the entire context and approaching behavior change from a function based perspective. The key is not only teaching communication, but teaching the right type of communication in order to produce long lasting behavior change. However, we all know – there are those times when things do not go as planned. Learn how to tackle those high-stress situations where no option seems like the right one and all bets are off. This workshop highlights ready to use interventions and real-life scenarios. The concepts can be applied to a wide range of environments. Beginner

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. How and when to implement reinforcement to foster increases in positive, prosocial, and functional communicative
  2. Causes and functions of problem behavior and explore options for altering the environmental context to reduce these
  3. Strategies for problem behaviors maintained by attention, escape, and sensory functions and develop a corresponding communicative replacement
  4. Develop strategies for coping during situations of extreme

 

MONDAY SESSIONS

All Day Sessions (Morning sessions that are continued in the afternoon; must attend all day to receive credit)

 

#16   8:30 a.m.- 4:15 p.m. (afternoon session will begin at 1:15)    BUILDING FINE MOTOR AND LANGUAGE   THROUGH PLAY USING FREE OR INEXPENSIVE MATERIALS; Julie Marzano, M.S., OTR/L; Emily McCarthy, M.S., CCC-SLP – How are you addressing fine motor, language and academic needs in early childhood? Learn how to meet ALL of these needs in only 5-15 minutes a day using up-cycled, inexpensive, dollar store and household items. Developed by a Speech Pathologist and Occupational Therapist, these play-based activities can be implemented by anyone, anywhere. Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Adapt current teaching to address fine motor and language
  2. Omplement fine motor and language activities in any
  3. Participants will be able to administer activities with upgrading and downgrading based on individual student’s needs.
  4. Describe how these activities are an effective RTI intervention, linked to Kindergarten Common
  5. Summarize play-based learning, fine motor, and early

 

#17   8:30 a.m. – 4:45 p.m.      THE KAUFMAN SPEECH TO LANGUAGE PROTOCOL: METHODS & BEHAVIORAL  STRATEGIES TO BUILD SUCCESSFUL VOCAL COMMUNICATION; Nancy R. Kaufman, M.A., CCC-SLP – The Kaufman Speech to Language Protocol (K-SLP) evaluation and treatment approach will be demonstrated. Elements of shaping word approximations to simplify the difficult motor plan of words, the use of natural phonological processes in therapy, and cueing and scripting systems will be highlighted via video. The K-SLP is rooted in the teaching strategies of applied behavior analysis (ABA) and motor learning principles in regard to practice schedules, feedback, and retention of  skills. This effective method for children with apraxia of speech will be shared in a functional manner, with many tips and suggestions clinicians and parents can use immediately. Intermediate

 Learner Outcomes

  1. Understand and analyze a norm-referenced, standardized test which relates directly to this approach in order to identify this unique population of
  2. Use evaluation information to establish goals for single words and
  3. Implement a specific treatment approach using phonological processes to simplify the motor plans for
  4. Provide five lists of single words to target in
  5. List principles of motor learning for the acquisition vs the retention stages of
  6. Explain the importance of mixing and varying tasks/blocked vs random

 

MONDAY SESSIONS 10:15 – 11:45 a.m.

 

#18  IMPROVING SPEECH CLARITY FOR THE HARD TO UNDERSTAND CHILD WITH DEAFNESS; Molly Weber, M.A., CCC- SLP, LSLS Cert. AVEd. – This session will focus on strategies to teach young children who are deaf or hard of hearing how to progress through articulation. The session will address both typical speech learners and learners who do not progress through developmentally appropriate sequences. Videos will be shown to highlight strategies and encourage discussion. Beginner

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Identify 3 steps to increasing articulation to a word
  2. Identify early speech targets for children with cochlear
  3. Identify reasons to work on vowels with children who are deaf or hard of
  4. Create appropriate speech goals for children who are deaf or hard of

 

#19   THE  MINIMALIST  SLP: MAKING  DO  WITH  LESS  SO  YOU  CAN  ULTIMATELY  ACCOMPLISH MORE; Nicole Allison, M.A., CCC-SLP – Speech-language pathologists working in schools are experiencing burnout at an alarming rate. But it’s not because we’re not doing enough. This session will explore a reverse view of the “More is Best” philosophy by supplying research to reestablish priorities, sharing practical therapy ideas using virtually no materials, and providing timesaving shortcuts by ultimately doing less but accomplishing more. Beginner

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Cite supporting research in incorporating less into their therapy
  2. List and perform at least 3 therapy activities using minimal therapy
  3. Name and describe at least 3 strategies to saving time in their

 

#20   WORKLOAD CLINICS: SOLVING THE WORKLOAD DILEMMA ONE DISTRICT AT A TIME; Barbara Conrad, M.A., CCC- SLP; Julie Hauck, M.A., CCC-SLP; Ann Slone, M.A., CCC-SLP – Is your workload manageable? Is it in line with the Operating Standards two-prong approach? Does your district use a workload calculator to determine workload assignments? Reserve a team appointment to discuss workload/caseload with a workload expert in the state and your district SLP team members. In these clinics, participants will review ODE’s requirements for a two prong approach, discuss the benefits of a time study, review workload calculator options and be introduced to resources to assist in implementing ODE’s required workload approach. Intermediate

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Locate ODE workload language and suggested
  2. Explain the importance of determining standard
  3. Document their workload and insert data into a workload

To make a reservation, one person from your team MUST contact Ellen at 888-258-1032

 

#21  THE   GIVE   AND   TAKE   OF   SCHOOL-BASED   AUDIOLOGYDonna  Fisher  Smiley,  Ph.D.,  CCC-A  – School  based audiologists are often the bridge between a child’s school setting and his/her clinic based audiologist. In order for a child with hearing loss to achieve optimal outcomes, information and ideas have to be shared between these entities. This session will focus on improving collaboration for issues such as providing families with accurate and useful information related to education, building evidence based cases for hearing assistive technology, and formulating goals that are appropriate and targeted. Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. List reasons why school-based audiologists need to collaborate and communicate with other professionals in order to benefit
  2. Describe ways to collaborate and communicate with other professionals and to justify time in their schedules for this
  3. Formulate an evidence based case for the use hearing assistive technology in the

 

MONDAY SESSIONS 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.

 

#22 EMERGENT  LITERACY  ACTIVITIES  FOR  CHILDREN  WITH  COMPLEX  COMMUNICATION  NEEDS  AND  AAC;      Tina Moreno, M.A., CCC-SLP – This session will provide strategies for delivering language and literacy instruction for students who are emergent literacy learners with complex communication needs.  Beginning communicators, and all  the ways they communicate, will be described. This session will discuss why and how the core vocabulary words and symbols are taught and modeled. Participants will practice generating words and phrases using the Universal Core and will determine multiple ways to use individual words. A review of emergent literacy routines adapted for students who may be non-verbal, use AAC or struggle with functional communication skills will be shared. Instructional routines such as predictable chart writing, shared reading, independent reading, independent writing and alphabet and phonological awareness for emergent literacy learners will be discussed. Intermediate

 Learners Outcomes:

  1. Identify strategies for embedding communication throughout the school
  2. Differentiate between emergent literacy and conventional
  3. Explain 3-4 emergent literacy routines adapted for students complex communication needs and
  4. Identify no-tech AAC tools that promote communication when robust AAC systems are
  5. Describe methods for teaching and modeling core vocabulary during literacy

 

#23   WORKLOAD CLINICS: SOLVING THE WORKLOAD DILEMMA ONE DISTRICT AT A TIME (REPEAT SESSION); Barbara Conrad, M.A., CCC-SLP; Julie Hauck, M.A., CCC-SLP; Ann Slone, M.A., CCC-SLP – Is your workload manageable? Is it in line with the Operating Standards two-prong approach? Does your district use a workload calculator to determine workload assignments? Reserve a team appointment to discuss workload/caseload with a workload expert in the state and your district SLP team members. In these clinics, participants will review ODE’s requirements for a two prong approach, discuss the benefits of a time study, review workload calculator options and be introduced to resources to assist in implementing  ODE’s required workload approach.; Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Locate ODE workload language and suggested
  2. Explain the importance of determining standard
  3. Document their workload and insert data into a workload

To make a reservation, one person from your team MUST contact Ellen at 888-258-1032 MONDAY SESSIONS

1:30 – 4:45 p.m.

#24   ADVANCEMENTS IN AUDITORY PROCESSING; Matt Barker – Auditory Processing is an area in which many shy away for lack of education, understanding, historical time constraints, and deficit directed therapies. This presentation will review what auditory processing actually is and how it relates to language and reading. It will also review new methods of testing/reporting and therapeutic options available and their efficacy data.  Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Identify how auditory processing relates to language and
  2. Set up, deliver, and review new methods for testing auditory
  3. Review reports and make clinical decisions on appropriate therapeutic

 

#25  MAXIMIZING  YOUR  SLP EFFECTIVENESS  AND  EFFICIENCY; Teresa Farnham, M.A., CCC-SLP –    Communication skills are vital to student success. While this makes ours a rewarding field, school-based SLPs also frequently express feelings of stress, overwork and frustration from trying to meet student needs, document progress, and navigate the IEP process. Refresh your skills in therapy planning, documentation, implementation and evaluation. Learn to establish priorities and implement time-saving practices. From a bird’s-eye view, realistically evaluate all facets of your work. Learn strategies that support student progress when you’re not even there! Get refreshed and be ready for  the challenges of 2018-19! Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Define frequency, intensity and dosage as they apply to speech-language
  2. Name the components of the Urgency and Importance Matrix and apply them to workload decisions.
  3. Identify 3 workload and/or therapy strategies to implement after the

 

#26  20 MINUTE LESSONS FOR DEVELOPING PHONEMIC PROCESSING IN THE STRUGGLING READER AND WRITER; Vickie Dinsmore, SLP, M.Ed. – This course presents methods for determining presence of phonemic processing impairment adversely affecting development of reading fluency and spelling accuracy in authentic writing. It explains how to use mini-lessons with real words, for treatment to improve student ability to discriminate between vowel tones & voiced / voiceless consonant sounds | and blending, segmenting, deleting, & sequencing phonemes | in simple and complex syllables. Other information includes phoneme/phonic relationships, therapy session outline, and sample goals. “20 Minute Phonemic Training for Dyslexia, Auditory Processing and Spelling” written by Vickie Dinsmore, the presenter of this course, is the basis for the course.    Beginner

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Know how to identify a phonemic processing impairment, which phonemes are specifically adversely affecting student reading and spelling, which phonemic skills are specifically adversely affecting student reading and spelling [discriminating, blending, segmenting, deleting, inserting and/or sequencing]
  2. Strategies for helping the student to improve discriminating, blending, segmenting, deleting, inserting and/or sequencing phonemes in simple and complex syllables when decoding and encoding
  3. How to structure a mini-lesson for specific, individualized needs for students based upon observational data collected in the identification
  4. Learn how to, pre- and post- test for phonemic processing
  5. Learn how to build associations between phonemes and phonic rule letter

 

#27  COGNITIVE  PROCESSING  MODEL  FOR  ACADEMIC  LEARNING:   AN  INTEGRATED  APPROACH  TO  ASSESSMENT  AND INTERVENTION; Tera Sumpter, M.A., CCC-SLP – Various cognitive processes are involved in learning including speech development, phonological processing, visual imagery processing for symbols, visual imagery processing for gestalt concepts, receptive and expressive language, and executive functions. Weakness in one or all of these areas can greatly affect a child’s ability to learn and succeed academically. It is imperative that professionals use a  comprehensive and integrative cognitive model to assess and treat our children so that a complete picture is obtained. Cognitive processes do not function in isolation. They are integrated and function together and therefore should be evaluated and treated in the same manner. Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Articulate extensive knowledge of the Cognitive Processing Model for Academic
  2. Explore the different subsets of the Cognitive Processing Model for Academic Learning and how they are integrated.
  3. Determine the cognitive processing systems involved in literacy
  4. Communicate the role that executives functions play in the learning
  5. Design assessment and treatment protocols based on the integrated Cognitive Processing Model for children with dyslexia, ADHD, reading comprehension deficits, auditory comprehension deficits, specific learning impairments, language disorders, speech disorders, developmental delays, math difficulties, executive function impairments and other learning
  6. Utilize new activities to incorporate into your classrooms, therapy sessions or

 

#28  TRAUMA: ITS IMPACT ON LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT AND USE IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS; Janice M.   Wright, M.A., CCC-SLP; Kellie Pauley, M.S., CCC-SLP – This presentation will examine how trauma can affect the language development and use of children and adolescents who have experienced trauma. This presentation will discuss brain development, trauma and language development, assessment of this population and finally treatment. The role of the Speech Language Pathologist is essential in the assessment and treatment of children/adolescents who have  experienced trauma. Intermediate

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Identify the areas of the brain directly affected by
  2. Identify the areas of language development and use that are affected in children and adolescents who have experienced
  3. Discuss the expanded role of the speech-language pathologist in the assessment and treatment of language disorders in children and adolescents affected by

 

#29   GIVING BACK: SERVICE DELIVERY FOR FEEDING AND SWALLOWING IN THE SCHOOLS; Donna Edwards, M.A., CCC- SLP, BCS-S, ASHA Fellow – Growing research regarding typical and atypical feeding and swallowing patterns in children and young adults supports evaluation and treatment for success at home, school and in the community. Research provides sound evidence based practice of care and advocacy for children and families across settings and ages. SLPs can support students having feeding and swallowing disorders through continuing education, ethical practices, incorporation of core curriculum standards and family supports. Topic discussions will incorporate case studies. Intermediate

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. State 3 ways services for feeding and swallowing in the schools is educationally relevant and supports core curriculum
  2. State 2 family centered interventions related to pediatric feeding and swallowing
  3. List two levels of therapy that will be utilized with students who have swallowing and feeding
  4. State 3 anatomical and physiological parameters to diagnose and/or treat feeding and
  5. State 4 recent research resources supporting treatment and evaluation of feeding disorders and dysphagia in children.
  6. State 3 behavior management techniques to promote successful diagnosis and treatment related to feeding and swallowing

 

MONDAY SESSIONS 3:15 – 4:45 p.m.

 

#30 SPEECH GENERATING DEVICES:  NEGOTIATING THE FUNDING MAZE WITH OHIO DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAID (ODM) AND OTHER RESOURCES; Kimberly Hale, CCC-SLP; Dan Lipka, OT, TobiiATI; Mark Rogers, Ohio Department of Medicaid; Jennifer Monahan, M.A., CCC-SLP; Lynn Dudek, SLP; Noah Trembly – This session will provide an overview of the revisions to ODM 5160-10-24 that was instituted on July 17, 2018 for funding for speech-generating devices. A thorough review of the new criteria, Certificate of Medical Necessity and types of SGD equipment that may be funded will be provided. A professional panel composed of policy representative(s) from ODM, vendors and practicing speech-language pathologist with clinical competencies in SGD’s will be present for an interactive session. Guidance for the submission with other third-party funding sources such as Medicare, Ohio Medicaid Mange Care Organizations (HMOs-Molina, Caresource, Buckeye, etc..) and private insurance will be discussed. Intermediate

 

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Identify the required components to submit for funding of a speech-generating device to ODM for their consumers who are Medicaid
  2. Identify the required components to submit for funding of a speech-generating device to an ODM-HMO for their consumers who receive their Medicaid benefits through on

3       Identify how to advocate for their consumer if funding is denied.

  1. Generate a resource list of available professionals in the individuals in the field to assist in the acquisition and funding of SGD’s for their
  2. Obtain answers and clarification of the new process to develop a funding submission
  3. Identify SGD evaluation centers and professionals for referral to complete the evaluation and submission processes if they do not possess the clinical competencies for their consumer who needs an

 

#31  DIGGIN‘ GIVING BACK; Lynda Park, M.A., CCC-SLP; Janet Yoder, M. Ed. – Do you ever question if you make a difference in the lives of others on your job? Are you looking for a unique way to meet the needs of your students with more severe disabilities and impact your community and world at the same time? Then come to this session and learn about our school-based gardening program that is a unique collaborative opportunity for this SLP and Intervention Specialist to provide vital hands-on life and job skills training to the students they serve and to simultaneously give  back to their community and beyond. Be inspired to follow in their gardening footsteps or to create your own  distinctive way to meet your students’ needs. Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. List ways current literature supports the use of gardening for individuals with
  2. Identify methods to highlight the skills, talents, and successes of the students being
  3. Learn how to use crowd funding websites and other funding methods to get support for purchasing needed supplies.
  4. Describe ways that professionals can collaborate and implement a unique project that can give back to the community where those participants are
  5. Be inspired to create their own school-based garden or one-of-a-kind hands-on learning opportunity to prepare students for the job market and responsible

 

#32    WORKLOAD CLINICS: SOLVING THE WORKLOAD DILEMMA ONE DISTRICT AT A TIME (REPEAT SESSION); BarbaraConrad, M.A., CCC-SLP; Julie Hauck, M.A., CCC-SLP; Ann Slone, M.A., CCC-SLP – Is your workload manageable? Is it in line with the Operating Standards two-prong approach? Does your district use a workload calculator to determine workload assignments? Reserve a team appointment to discuss workload/caseload with a workload expert in the state and your district SLP team members. In these clinics, participants will review ODE’s requirements for a two prong approach, discuss the benefits of a time study, review workload calculator options and be introduced to resources to assist in implementing  ODE’s required workload approach.; Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Locate ODE workload language and suggested
  2. Explain the importance of determining standard
  3. Document their workload and insert data into a workload

To make a reservation, one person from your team MUST contact Ellen at 888-258-1032

 

TUESDAY SESSIONS 8:30 – 10:00 a.m.

 

#33  MORE BANG FOR YOUR BOOK; Jenna Rayburn Kirk, M.A., CCC-SLP – Preschool literacy-based instruction increases transdisciplinary teamwork, allows for repeated practice and classroom carryover, and aligns with the curriculum. Evidence supports literacy instruction for children with language delays and children learning English as a second language. This course highlights practical ideas for contextualized language instruction utilizing children’s literature for preschool and early elementary SLPs. Beginner 

Learner Outcomes:

  1. List 3 benefits to literacy-based instruction in speech therapy
  2. Evaluate attributes of texts appropriate for therapy
  3. Name 3 practical treatment activities for familiar texts

 

#34   WORKLOAD CLINICS: SOLVING THE WORKLOAD DILEMMA ONE DISTRICT AT A TIME (REPEAT SESSION); Barbara Conrad, M.A., CCC-SLP; Julie Hauck, M.A., CCC-SLP; Ann Slone, M.A., CCC-SLP – Is your workload manageable? Is it in line with the Operating Standards two-prong approach? Does your district use a workload calculator to determine workload assignments? Reserve a team appointment to discuss workload/caseload with a workload expert in the state and your district SLP team members. In these clinics, participants will review ODE’s requirements for a two prong approach, discuss the benefits of a time study, review workload calculator options and be introduced to resources to assist in implementing ODE’s required workload approach. Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Locate ODE workload language and suggested
  2. Explain the importance of determining standard
  3. Document their workload and insert data into a workload

To make a reservation, one person from your team MUST contact Ellen at 888-258-1032

 

#35  OHIO RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS WITH HEARING LOSS; Christine Croyle, OCALI; Gaye Spetka, ATOhio; Janice Mador, OOD; Karen Penny, OOD; Patrick Adams, OOD; This panel will provide an informative overview and discussion regarding resources available to students with disabilities. This will include presentations and time for questions and answers. Beginner 

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Identify the three main classes of assistive
  2. Identify assistive technology
  3. Understanding of programs and services offered to Ohioans with Disabilities through Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities, Assistive Technology of Ohio, and Ohio Center for Autism and Low

TUESDAY SESSIONS 8:30 – 11:45 a.m.

 

#36   WHAT MAKES AN OUTSTANDING SCHOOL CLINICIAN?; Wayne A. Secord, Ph.D. – Why are some school clinicians so successful? What do they do that works so well? This program will offer a critical look at the nature of school-based clinical excellence and describe a number of leadership ideas and strategies that can be used by school clinicians to produce change in the students they serve. The program will: (1) consider the nature of clinical leadership excellence in school-based practice, (2) identify key coaching and consultation skills, (3) describe leadership skills in classroom- based assessment, (4) discuss what school clinicians can do to assume clinical leadership roles in the schools, and (5) present a summary of the top-10 leadership concepts, practices, strategies, etc. used by school clinicians in speech- language pathology. Participants who attend this program will gain new perspectives on clinical leadership excellence and leave with practical ideas and strategies they can put to use right away. Beginner

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Describe the nature of clinical leadership excellence in School Speech-Language
  2. Describe how school-based instructional leaders utilize effective consultation skills to coach and empower their students.
  3. Describe leadership skills and strategies in classroom-based
  4. Identify the commonalties of outstanding clinical leaders in the
  5. Identify the top-10 concepts, practices, strategies used by school-based clinical leaders in speech-language pathology.

 

#37 MEETING THE NEEDS OF PEOPLE WHO STUTTER: SEEING, FEELING, AND EXPERIENCING COUNSELING APPROACHESAlison LaJuett, B.A.; Heather Salvo, CF-SLP; Scott Palasik, Ph.D., CCC-SLP – The purpose of this presentation is to provide SLPs with therapeutic applications to address thoughts and feelings related to stuttering. Due to lack of formal clinical training in psychotherapeutic principles, SLPs may find these therapies difficult to translate into the therapeutic setting. Therapies which address how stuttering affects the whole person are clinically relevant and necessary for many PWS. This session aims to demonstrate and provide opportunities for experiential learning of counseling approaches. Beginner

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Explain the cognitive triangle, as it relates to using psychotherapeutic approaches in stuttering
  2. Explain the rationale for integration of various psychotherapeutic approaches in stuttering
  3. Apply various psychotherapeutic approaches in stuttering

 

#38 FACILITATING RAPID PROGRESS FOR CHILDREN WITH SEVERE SPEECH SOUND DISORDERS; Teresa Farnham,  M.A., CCC-SLP – Research over the past 25 years has demonstrated that effective treatment of phonological disorders  requires re-organization of a child’s phonological system. This re-organization is facilitated by basing treatment on careful analysis of a child’s phonological knowledge for the purpose of selecting effective targets. In  addition, treatment should be implemented using language-based therapy strategies. During this session, application of these principles via practical therapeutic strategies will be addressed, using specific case examples. Use of the phonological approach in a school setting in group and individual therapy will also be discussed. Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Identify necessary elements of phonological assessment to support selection of appropriate phonemic targets for therapeutic
  2. Identify key components of effective phonological
  3. Identify key strategies for effective phonological

 

#39  BUILDING BRIDGES: MAKING COMMUNITY EVENTS & ACTIVITIES ACCESSIBLE; Kathy Keaggy Brown – Attending & being a part of community events from being on-stage at a local theater to a visit with Santa can be overwhelming and discouraging for people with special needs and their families. We know that inclusion at school is important and beneficial. Inclusion should not stop when someone graduates. This presentation will teach (& hopefully inspire) participants to make community events, clubs, organizations & groups accessible for everyone (including those with disabilities). A community theater & Christmas Light Show in Ohio are just two examples of how to create a program or take an already-existing event and make it accessible and comfortable for families of people with special needs. Community events can be viewed as an extension of Integrated Comprehensive Services (ICS). By using what you already know as an SLP & educator, this presentation will teach you how to use the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) model and transfer it into your community. Beginner

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Feel empowered to make at least one local community event, activity or group accessible to all members of the community.
  2. Know how to take the educational concept of LRE and translate that into our communities’
  3. Recognize the importance of breaking down barriers that make many community events difficult for families of people with special needs to
  4. Know how to help others who are not in our field feel more comfortable about Special Needs through educating them.

 

TUESDAY SESSION

All Day Sessions (Morning sessions that are continued in the afternoon; must attend all day to receive credit)

 

#40  8:30  a.m.-  3:30  p.m.    CYCLES  FOR  PHONOLOGY  AND  REDUPLICATED  SYLLABLE  THERAPYDawn  M.    Moore, ClinScD, CCC-SLP – Cycles for Phonology focuses on patterns and efficient generalization through target selection that can drastically reduce therapy time for children with difficult phonological process challenges. Children exhibiting high usage of phonological processes (i.e., use t/k and t/s) can benefit greatly from the Cycles Approach. The participants will learn how to target patterns of sounds rather than individual sounds in each place (initial, medial, final) and type of utterance (word, phrase, sentence, conversation). The instructor will take participants through an overview of the approach, scoring of the Hodson Assessment of Phonological Processes-3 (HAPP-3), and therapy session design using the Cycles Guidelines and Organizational Chart. This interactive course will provide strategies to use in your therapy sessions tomorrow! Implementing this program can reduce therapy time by 50% or more, even in children with severe/profound phonological delays. Intermediate

 

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Explain the difference between Cycles for Phonology and Traditional Articulation
  2. Describe and list the primary patterns targeted in the Cycles
  3. Design a Cycle based on the primary patterns using a transcript and the Cycles
  4. Implement Cycles with a child with phonological

 

 

#41  8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.      SOCIALLY SAVVY IN SCHOOLS; Angie Neal, M.S., CCC-SLP – The goal of education is to get students college and career ready. No matter which path students choose, social communication will be vital to their success. Positive intervention for social communication disorders begins with a thorough assessment. In the school setting, this includes addressing the impact on academic and functional performance. With comprehensive data, the SLP is an integral member of the IEP team to answer the three prongs of eligibility of a disability classification under the Individuals with Disability Education Act (IDEA). This workshop is full of useful information for SLPs working with preschool and school-age children with social communication deficits. It will include simple strategies that are designed to be used by all members of the IEP team, not just the SLP, since social communication happens throughout the day. Get ready to have some fun while learning easy strategies that can easily be implemented immediately. Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Outline how social skill deficits can have an adverse academic
  2. Describe effective ways to identify social language
  3. Discuss 5-10 strategies to improve social
  4. Name up to 3 books of children’s literature to help with social skill
  5. Summarize the four foundational areas of social communication: Central Coherence, Emotion, Theory of Mind and Executive Function
  6. Lead the IEP team in differentiation consideration of pragmatic language deficits from other related difficulties in order to determine an appropriate disability

 

TUESDAY SESSIONS 10:15 – 11:45 a.m.

 

#42  MEDICAID SCHOOL  PROGRAM (MSP):   EDUCATIONAL AND  MEDICAID AGENCY PERSPECTIVE ON     SCHOOL-BASED THERAPY; Mark H. Smith, MPA, BA, QIDP, CPM, Lesley Scott-Charlton – The purpose of this presentation is to offer both the educational and Medicaid perspective on school therapy services. The Medicaid Schools Program is a program that meets both medical and educational needs: come hear from the agency leads on their insights on the program today, and why the future of healthcare starts in school. Intermediate

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Give a full perspective on education and healthcare perspectives of school-based therapy
  2. Answer questions about program
  3. Seek feedback on concerns facing therapists in the school

 

#43  WORKLOAD CLINICS: SOLVING THE WORKLOAD DILEMMA ONE DISTRICT AT A TIME (REPEAT SESSION); Barbara Conrad, M.A., CCC-SLP; Julie Hauck, M.A., CCC-SLP; Ann Slone, M.A., CCC-SLP – Is your workload manageable? Is it in line with the Operating Standards two-prong approach? Does your district use a workload calculator to determine workload assignments? Reserve a team appointment to discuss workload/caseload with a workload expert in the state and your district SLP team members. In these clinics, participants will review ODE’s requirements for a two prong approach, discuss the benefits of a time study, review workload calculator options and be introduced to resources to assist in implementing  ODE’s required workload approach.; Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Locate ODE workload language and suggested
  2. Explain the importance of determining standard
  3. Document their workload and insert data into a workload

 

To make a reservation, one person from your team MUST contact Ellen at 888-258-1032

 

#44   OTICON    PEDIATRICS:   IMPROVING    COMMUNICATION    AND    CONNECTIVITY;   Donna   Grant,   Au.D.,   CCC-A – Technological limitations of today’s hearing instruments make it difficult for individuals with hearing loss to perform well in complex listening environments. This seminar addressed the communication needs of pediatrics with hearing loss and introduced Oticon Opn™ as a solution. Concepts related to this new, unprecedented approach were presented with particular emphasis on the opportunities to stay connected in both personal and educational settings.    Beginner 

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Identify the two main technologies that contribute to the new open sound
  2. List how the technology in the latest hearing instrument is proven to provide benefit for pediatric
  3. Describe the four main functions of Oticon

 

TUESDAY SESSIONS 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

 

#45  ROGER FOR EDUCATION: SOLUTIONS FOR DYNAMIC CLASSROOMS; Alicia VanderZanden, Au.D. –  This presentation will discuss Phonak’s current Roger for Education portfolio and include updates on new technology. It will discuss selection, setup, and compatibility.   Beginner 

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Explain the basics of Roger
  2. Identify devices under the Roger for education

 

TUESDAY SESSIONS 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.

 

#46   THE METALINGUISTIC BRIDGE: LANGUAGE COMPETENCE AND CLASSROOM SUCCESS; Wayne A. Secord, Ph.D. – The ability to use one’s communication and language system as a tool is an essential aspect of school-age language competence. This session will provide an overview of metalinguistic awareness, stages of development, and the importance of semantic knowledge and working memory skills. Information about improving students’ metalinguistic skills and strategies will be presented using two case studies that illustrate a practical classroom-based approach to illustrate the importance of becoming “Meta”. Participants who attend this program will leave with new perspectives on clinical and educational assessment as well as with practical strategies they can put to use right away. Beginner/Intermediate

 

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Illustrate how students with marginal oral language test scores might perform on the CELF-5 Test of Metalinguistics.
  2. Describe how students with poor to marginal metalinguistic skills might impact classroom-based language and learning.
  3. Describe how semantic knowledge and working memory skills are linked to metalinguistic
  4. Describe how practical classroom-based assessment can be used to explain what students struggle to do, say, make and use in

 

#47  IMPROVING ASSESSMENT, THERAPY AND EDUCATIONAL ACCESS FOR SPEAKERS OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ENGLISHDionna Latimer-Hearn, M.A., CCC-SLP – Research shows that SLPs receive inconsistent training to support African American English (AAE)-speaking students in contemporary educational settings. As a result, there has been an increase in the number of students qualified for services due to language differences rather than language disorders. This presentation will examine differences between AAE and Mainstream or Standard American English. Methods for more accurate assessment and development of goals (if indicated by evidence of disorder) will also be reviewed. Finally, SLPs will examine how Dominant Language Ideology marginalizes youth who present with nonmainstream dialects and explore ways to promote understanding and awareness among educational stakeholders. Intermediate

 

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Identify at least three ways in which varied sociocultural practices impact students’ academic
  2. Identify prominent features of African American English across linguistic domains (i.e., morphology, syntax, phonology, pragmatics, semantics).
  3. More effectively differentiate between language difference and language
  4. Support understanding and awareness of dialectal difference among school-based

 

#48  THE  ANALYSIS OF  EXPRESSIVE AND  RECEPTIVE  VOCABULARY: CASE  STUDIES  USING  PPVT-5 AND  EVT-3; Adam Scheller, Ph.D. – Speech-Language Pathologists strive to find the most effective measures to evaluate the communication profiles of school-aged children. Such evaluations are often driven by referral questions such as “Does Student A have a speech-language impairment,” and “What interventions can be recommended based on Student B’s communication profile?” The Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, 5th Edition (PPVT-5) and Expressive Vocabulary Test, 3rd Edition (EVT-3) are effective measures of receptive and expressive vocabulary often used in this context. During this seminar, participants will learn about the evaluation of vocabulary through school-aged case studies, including current research on both the PPVT-5 and EVT-3.    Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Describe the constructs measured by the PPVT-5 and EVT-3.
  2. Identify two research findings that support the use of PPVT-5 and EVT-3 for analysis of Expressive and Receptive Vocabulary.
  3. Describe how assessment results from the PPVT-5 and EVT-3 inform diagnostic formulation and

 

#49  DISCUSSION OF CURRENT HOT TOPICS & THEIR SIZZLING IMPACT ON SCHOOL SERVICES; Barbara Conrad, M.A., CCC-SLP; Bethany Whidden, M.A., CCC-SLP; Jane Romick Renkiewicz; Lisa Froehlich; Dianne Clemens, M.A., CCC-SLP – State speech and language leaders give back to school-based SLPs across Ohio by presenting hot topics facing school-based providers and sharing how these sizzling issues potentially impact school based services. Speech- Language Supervisory Network members will facilitate the presentation highlighting issues such as entry/exit criteria, workload, Medicaid documentation and progress monitoring. Pop in to see what’s cookin’. Intermediate

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Explain current practice issues facing personnel in school
  2. Describe solutions for key practice issues that involve stakeholders at multiple levels (school, district, and state level personnel).
  3. Network and problem-solve with other

#50   FUNCTIONAL STRATEGIES FOR TREATING CHILDHOOD APRAXIA OF SPEECH IN SCHOOLS; BeckyAnn Harker,    M.A.,CCC-SLP – Are you frustrated by a lack of progress in your children with severe speech sound disorders? Perhaps you need a different treatment method. Learn some key aspects of Childhood Apraxia of Speech and how to differentiate it from severe phonological disorders. In this workshop you will get an overview of current treatment methods for   CAS, learn to choose speech targets, and leave with many ready-to-implement ideas that can be used in the school environment to help your unintelligible students become intelligible. Intermediate

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Differentiate between Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) and severe phonological
  2. name different treatment approaches for
  3. Prioritize speech targets/goals for students with
  4. List a variety of activities to elicit and practice speech
  5. Write IEP goals and objectives to target improved speech for students with

 

#51   TRIALS, TRIBULATIONS  & TRIUMPHS  OVER  STUTTERING  (A REAL  LIFE  STORY);  Norbert  J. Lewandowski, CPA,MBA – From childhood to adulthood Nobby’s life held many challenges, but Nobby chose to turn those challenges into opportunities. Learn how he managed to overcome taunting and discomfort in childhood and the dreaded teenage years by finding the key to acceptance. Walk with him through college, his first job interview, and his shattered dream with a major accounting firm. Along the way, he will tell you what he found worked for him when his stuttering posed a problem. These tips may help other stutterers in their everyday conversations. He has achieved one of his goals – to become a public speaker. Beginner

Learner Outcomes:

  1. Discover the process to be accepted as a whole
  2. Learning little tips and tricks to overcome getting hung up on
  3. Find out how turning challenges into opportunities can be

 

#52    RESOLVING ETHICAL DILEMMAS – BEST PRACTICES FOR SCHOOL-BASED SLPS AND AUDS (AUDIOLOGY FOCUS); Gregg B. Thornton, Esq.; Carrie L. Spangler, Au.D.; CCC-A; Lisa A. Froehlich, Ph.D., CCC-SLP – Ethics is a  verb- it’s all about what you do and how you do it. Ethical issues span every aspect of our practice and can present dilemmas for practitioners at all levels of experience. This session will address various facets of ethical dilemmas, including tips on how to respond when you find yourself caught between that proverbial rock and a hard place.  Building on feedback from previous ethics presentations and dilemmas addressed by the Ohio licensure board, we have incorporated real-life scenarios into an interactive, engaging, and informative session that allows participants to decide whether an ethical dilemma is present. Beginner

 Learner Outcomes:

  1. Name/describe common ethical issues that practitioners encounter in the school
  2. State ethical requirements adopted by the Ohio Speech and Hearing Professionals Board (OSHPB) and identify specific rules under each code of ethics that address specific
  3. State how the Code of Ethics OSHPB can be an effective resource to preventing ethical conflicts in the school setting and to educate others about the role of speech-language pathologists and educational
  4. List other resources/strategies for following best practices to resolve ethical
  5. Understand how to recognize and appropriately respond to an ethical
  6. Understand how to implement and follow an ethical decision-making process to effectively resolve an ethical dilemma.
  7. Identify when the practitioner has a duty to report ethical violations to the